I Dreamt of Trees and Sky… and Painted This

Did you know that I dream my paintings before I actually paint them? Well, I do — whether a daydream among a stand of rustling trees, or a dream while I slumber under blackberry skies, I see my next paintings vividly in my head before they ever hit my paper canvas. Huh… just like Vincent van Gogh who said simply, “I dream my painting, and then I paint my dream”.

And, if we’re talking about how my process is like the Masters, Picasso explained it in more detail this way:

“How can you expect a beholder to experience my picture as I experienced it? A picture comes to me a long time beforehand; who knows how long a time beforehand, I sensed, saw, and painted it and yet the next day even I do not understand what I have done. How can anyone penetrate my dreams, my instincts, my desires, my thought, which have taken a long time to fashion themselves and come to the surface, above all to grasp what I put there, perhaps involuntary.”

Here’s a large format painting I made after dreaming of trees and sky:

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“Dreamt of Trees and Sky”, oil and metallic watercolor on panel, 52 x 52″, $5,400.

Why Do I Love to Paint Trees? Here’s a Hint.

I feel like a caterpillar.
After 12 years of my artist career, I’ve kicked off 2016 by examining everything I do:

Why do I paint?
What do I hope to share with you, through my art?
How do my inspirations guide what I put on paper?
Why do I love painting trees?

As I “metamorphosis” on these questions and more, I will share my discoveries with you this year. Right now, I can share a bit about those trees I love to paint so much.

As I travel my life’s path, I create idyllic places for me to “hide” — to keep me safe, and to belong — and all of these places always have trees.  Trees that shelter, that protect, and that cool. Evergreens and aspens from the mountains of my native Colorado, and towering hardwoods in the forests of southern Belgium. Trees that have trunks with those crisp lines that I love.

How could I not paint these trees, in those idyllic places?

 

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Large trees (aspen or birch?) are in progress in my studio (oil and metallic watercolor).

Winter Aspens: Making Oil and Watercolor Mix

I’m continuing my quest to master mixing oil and watercolors successfully and just might have a new series emerging: winter aspens. Or winter birch. I’m a bit torn since I love the aspen trees of my native Colorado in winter, but also love the birch found in the Pacific Northwest where I’ve spent many months painting in the winter over the last decade (and now live).

Here are two of my most recent winter trees – layers of oil paint (I use oil sticks such as Winsor & Newton Oilbars), followed by layers of watercolor paint (some traditional paints along with my own mix of metallic pigment powders).  At just the right time, I scrape the tree shapes out with an old favorite tool: pieces of cut up credit cards.

I’m loving these early results… what do you think?

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“Winter Aspens No. 3” and “Winter Aspens No. 5”, oil and metallic watercolor, 12 x 12 inches, $350.

Four Seasons of Trees… Heading Off to Minnesota

I’ve been working on a commercial office space project for awhile now and have just finished a set of my Four Seasons of Trees fine art reproductions! This project was a set of custom fine art prints on canvas – each is 14″ x 36″, stretched on 1.5″ deep gallery-wrap stretcher bars and finished by hand with my signature metallic highlights. I think this set will look really great in the office they’re heading to in Minnesota!

Be sure to contact me to discuss creating a custom set just for your home or office!

"Four Seasons of Trees", fine art giclee on canvas, 14" x 36" each.
“Four Seasons of Trees”, fine art giclee on canvas, 14″ x 36″ each.

Dr. Ph. Martin Hydrus Watercolors & Candied Trees

I finally succumbed to a cold last week (thanks goodness it wasn’t the flu!) and have been out of action for awhile… but, I’m getting better and will get back to painting today!

I’ve recently been experimenting with Hydrus watercolor paints (made by Dr. Ph. Martin) – they behave a bit differently than my favorite Daniel Smith paints, but their saturated, vivid colors are wonderful to create with.  I’ve been wanting to start a new series of fantastical trees – what do you think?

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Elementals – Five Candied Trees, Hydrus watercolor on paper, 22 x 30 inches.